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Woman at the well reflection questions

Barely two months after graduating from college, I boarded a plane and landed in The Gambia, West Africa, to begin my service as a Peace Corps volunteer. I found myself in a new land, with a new language, new customs and new food. I saw her in the village, women who worked day in and day out feeding and caring for their children and families; cleaning, cooking and working the fields. Women who laughed and cried with one another.

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Hidden Questions: Lessons From the Woman at the Well

I met Tamara at the Dallas Juvenile Center and found her willing to talk as we sat at the table. But how could I proceed with this young woman who had a fundamental misunderstanding of salvation? The same way Jesus did. Jesus met a woman as she approached a well in Samaria, and He opened a conversation by asking her for a drink. But she knew neither the gift nor the speaker, so Jesus proceeded. He knew she needed eternal life, and He introduced her to that need.

This was not unusual for the Lord. We read in the previous chapter, John 3, that while Nicodemus felt no need to be born again, Jesus knew his need. The needs people have are not always the needs they feel, and what Jesus offers is not a feeling of satisfaction for a felt need but genuine satisfaction for a real need.

Jesus offered the Samaritan woman living water to quench her thirst. The woman did not crave the water Jesus offered because she did not perceive her own spiritual thirst. So Jesus recounted her marital history. She had tried one man after another and had not found satisfaction.

Like many people today, she had attempted to quench a thirst for the heavenly with the earthly. When she understood her thirst, she understood that Jesus was speaking metaphorically.

While she was only beginning to see who Jesus is, she did understand that an offer of living water was an offer of access to God. Yet there was still a barrier: How could a Jew make her a legitimate offer of access to God when Jews did not believe Samaritans could come to God? Jesus had enabled her to see her need; next He overcame her objection. He was not unresponsive to her inquiries, but He refused to be sidetracked by them.

Instead he focused on helping her see her thirst. Only after she saw her thirst did He answer her objection. Earlier Jesus had engaged Nicodemus in this way. The real questions surface after people see their need of Christ. First, point them to their need. Once the Samaritan woman had seen her need, Jesus answered her objection. Was the offer legitimate? That was her real question. He had made her need obvious to her, and had overcome her objection.

Jesus had another lesson to teach. When the disciples arrived, they wondered why He was talking with a woman. Like the woman, the disciples had a need. She had a thirst, and they had a hunger. Her need was to drink the water of life, and their need was to reap the harvest of souls. The Samaritan woman went straight from the well to the field. She ran to communicate with the townspeople, and she started with them where they were. The Samaritans looked for the Christ and expected Him to be a prophet who would teach them.

And many believed because of her testimony v. How do we proceed? Jesus said sometimes one sows and another reaps v. Our field may not be ready for harvest, but it is always ready for labor. Whether we sow or reap, we labor with God for a lasting harvest. We stand in a field of people who drink in wealth, power, pleasures, and earthly relationships in an effort to satisfy their unquenched thirst.

Yet they object to the gospel. Christ has given us genuine satisfaction for our thirst, but we still have a hunger. Our food is in the field. DTS Magazine. Kelley M. Reg Grant. Charles R. Campus News. The Seminary is also George M. Hillman John Reece. The servants are given five, Susan Perlman. Timothy J. Timothy Ralston wrote a Kindred Spirit review of a book on the twelve days of Christmas. It generated a lot of interest. So, after further study, he tells us what he Robert A. Great Expectations?

Robert B. Fear Not! I Am With You! Robert Chisholm, explains that God is with us when we seek to carry out his commission, and he accomplishes his purpose in

Faith reflections: Women at the well

I met Tamara at the Dallas Juvenile Center and found her willing to talk as we sat at the table. But how could I proceed with this young woman who had a fundamental misunderstanding of salvation? The same way Jesus did. Jesus met a woman as she approached a well in Samaria, and He opened a conversation by asking her for a drink.

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people.

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What is the significance of this woman's identity as a “Samaritan woman?” (see v.9). 2. The woman at the well had had five failed marriages and currently was.

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Comments: 1
  1. Tebar

    Rather useful topic

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