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How can you see the solar eclipse safely

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By: Alan MacRobert August 8, 3. You can unsubscribe anytime. This view of the partially eclipsed Sun was made through a metal-coated glass filter, which produces a yellow or orange image of the Sun; most aluminized Mylar filters give a blue image. Looking at the Sun is harmful to your eyes at any time, partial eclipse or no. The danger that a partial solar eclipse poses is simply that it may prompt people to gaze at the Sun, something they wouldn't normally do. The result can be "eclipse blindness," a serious eye injury that can leave temporary or permanent blurred vision or blind spots at the center of your view.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: #CBSeclipse: Tips On How To View The Solar Eclipse Safely

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to make a solar eclipse viewer

Five Ways To View The Solar Eclipse

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The first thing to remember about observing an eclipse is safety. A solar eclipse is potentially dangerous, however, because viewing a solar eclipse involves looking at the Sun, which can damage your eyesight.

A solar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse , when the Sun itself is completely obscured by the Moon.

Partial eclipses , annular eclipses , and the partial phases of total solar eclipses are never safe to watch without taking special precautions.

Failure to use appropriate filtration may result in permanent eye damage or blindness. Looking at the Sun through any kind of optical aid binoculars, a telescope, or even a camera's viewfinder is extremely dangerous, and can cause permanent blindness. There is no pain or discomfort when the retina is being burned, and the resulting visual symptoms do not occur until at least several hours after the injury has occurred; by which time it is far too late. Professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait makes this case well Special report: Let your kids see the eclipse!

An article by professional astronomer and science communicator Phil Plait, making the case that children can and should be allowed to safely view a solar eclipse.

However, safety must come first; so if you are not confident that you, or people you are responsible for, can correctly follow the safety precautions outlined here, then it would be best to stay indoors and watch the event on TV or the internet.

To look at the Sun directly, you must use proper solar viewing protection, such as eclipse glasses. Sunglasses do not provide anything like adequate protection, as they do not block the wavelengths of light which are likely to damage your eyes, or reduce the intensity of the visible light sufficiently.

Since much of the damage is done by invisible infra-red light, the fact that the Sun appears dark in a filter or that you feel no discomfort does not guarantee that your eyes are safe. In fact, sunglasses can make it worse: as they block visible light, the pupil in your eye widens, letting in more harmful UV and infra-red light. Properly designed solar filters, made and certified to appropriate national safety standards, are therefore the recommended protection for direct viewing.

The relevant standard is ISO , so look for that mark. Genuine eclipse glasses made before may have been made to an older standard; they are probably fine, but still I would recommend trashing them and getting a new pair. They cost pennies, after all. These glasses should be much darker than regular sunglasses; they need to filter out ultra-violet, infra-red, and They should be reasonably new, and in good condition. If in doubt, or if they appear to be damaged at all, destroy them.

Various other ad-hoc solar filters are sometimes discussed; but in practice these can be dangerous, and so can't be recommended. Even if they seem to dim the Sun to a low level, they may be letting through invisible infra-red radiation which could be permanently harming your eyes.

In any case purpose-designed eclipse viewing glasses are readily and cheaply available, so it's simplest and safest to get the real thing. Fake goods of all kinds are becoming increasingly common; unfortunately, this can apply to solar viewing glasses too. It's terribly easy to make a pair of glasses with sub-standard tinted plastic, and print the relevant certification marks on them.

So be sure that you obtain whatever viewing aids you use from a reputable source. Viewing the Sun indirectly, by projecting its image onto a screen, is a safe way to enjoy any solar eclipse. You can make a projector with a simple pinhole, or with binoculars or a telescope, as described in Observing Eclipses.

Note that a screen refers to a matte surface, such as a white sheet, or a piece of paper, so that the Sun's image can be seen by anyone looking at it from any angle. Looking at a reflection of the Sun in any shiny surface is basically the same as looking directly at the Sun, and as dangerous.

The naked eye view of totality is safe and is the most awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon you are likely to see. Just remember to look away and put your eclipse glasses back on before the Sun returns. This is not true: looking at the Sun at any time for more than a second or two can cause permanent eye damage.

Finally, I've heard some truly daft ideas for eclipse viewing, such as looking through a sheet of Perspex, or in a reflection in a bucket of water. I have no idea where these come from, but these are not safe! If you can see the Sun clearly and brightly, whether directly, in a reflection, or via Perspex, then it's dangerous.

This page therefore contains some information on eye safety during a solar eclipse. Copyright C Ian Cameron Smith. Last modified: UTC.

The What: Eye Safety

To find out whether your home or any other specific location is within the path on August 21, , see Xavier Jubier's Google Map , which supports zooming in to street level. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun; they transmit thousands of times too much sunlight. Note: If your eclipse glasses or viewers are compliant with the ISO safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish. Such warnings are outdated and do not apply to eclipse viewers compliant with the ISO standard adopted in

By Jeff Herman , chief editor. Whether you choose to view a solar eclipse from your home, a hotel or an open field along roadway, you need to know how to watch a solar eclipse without damaging your eyes.

By Nicholas St. Fleur , David Baron and George Musser. On Aug. For a minute or two day will turn to night. If you are one of the lucky people who will get to see this total eclipse live and in-person, make sure you take advantage.

How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely

A solar eclipse will occur across most of the United States on April 8, , including a small band of total solar eclipse stretching from east to west across much of the continent. Before you do, please take the time to learn about the dangers to your vision and how to protect your eyes from injury during the eclipse. Never look directly at the sun during a solar eclipse except during the very brief time the sun is in total eclipse; and even then, with caution. Looking directly at the sun can cause permanent damage to your eyes. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the sun and the earth. The moon causes the light of the sun to be blocked from reaching earth, casting a shadow on earth. A total solar eclipse is when the moon completely blocks the sun.

Eclipse 101

The first thing to remember about observing an eclipse is safety. A solar eclipse is potentially dangerous, however, because viewing a solar eclipse involves looking at the Sun, which can damage your eyesight. A solar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse , when the Sun itself is completely obscured by the Moon. Partial eclipses , annular eclipses , and the partial phases of total solar eclipses are never safe to watch without taking special precautions. Failure to use appropriate filtration may result in permanent eye damage or blindness.

Please feel free to download maps, posters, fact sheet, safety bulletin and other materials for use in your communities and events. We appreciate it if you credit NASA.

You can also watch with our free Android and iOS app! Be sure to prepare for viewing solar eclipses live: use these tips and techniques to get a clear view without injuring your eyes. This is probably the most important part of this website.

How to Observe Sun and Solar Eclipses Safely?

Unfortunately, viewing the Sun comes with many risks. Looking directly at the Sun with the naked eye should be absolutely avoided - no matter what. It can and will cause permanent, irreversible eye damage.

Remember to use safe solar eclipse glasses and other equipment during the partial phases, and soak up the darkness during totality! In fact, you've probably been told that by lots of reputable sources including our own Space. A total solar eclipse happens when the central disk of the sun is completely covered by the moon. But total solar eclipses are a much rarer sight. A joint statement from NASA and the four other organizations says that with the right information, skywatchers can safely view the total solar eclipse in its full glory with the naked eye.

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By Anne Buckle and Aparna Kher. One of the easiest ways to safely watch a solar eclipse is to use 2 sheets of cardboard and make your own simple pinhole projector. Never look directly at the Sun without proper eye protection. You can seriously hurt your eyes and even go blind. The simplest and quickest way to safely project the Sun is with a projector made from only 2 pieces of card or paper. A box projector works on the same principles, it requires a little more time and a few extra items to construct, but it is more sturdy.

Pinhole Projection. The simplest safe way to view a partial solar eclipse is to watch the Sun's image projected onto a piece of paper. Poke a small hole in.

This educational resource is part of the The Great American Eclipse spotlight. No worries, you can appreciate this solar phenomenon using some simple projection devices you can make at home. Pinhole projectors are very cool, very old devices that date back thousands of years. This is probably the easiest and most well-known form of projection. All you need is a piece of card stock or cardboard and a pin.

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