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The woman in black susan hill read online

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She also wrote Mrs. She lives in Gloucestershire, where she runs her own small publishing company, Long Barn Books. Godine, Jaffrey, NH, in Published by arrangement with David R. Godine Publishers Inc. Vintage and colophon are registered trademarks of Random House, Inc.

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The Woman in Black

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. John Lawrence Illustrator. What real reader does not yearn, somewhere in the recesses of his or her heart, for a really literate, first-class thriller--one that chills the body, but warms the soul with plot, perception, and language at once astute and vivid?

In other words, a ghost story written by Jane Austen? Alas, we cannot give you Austen, but Susan Hill's remarkable Woman In Black comes as close What real reader does not yearn, somewhere in the recesses of his or her heart, for a really literate, first-class thriller--one that chills the body, but warms the soul with plot, perception, and language at once astute and vivid? Set on the obligatory English moor, on an isolated causeway, the story has as its hero Arthur Kipps, an up-and-coming young solicitor who has come north from London to attend the funeral and settle the affairs of Mrs.

Alice Drablow of Eel Marsh House. The routine formalities he anticipates give way to a tumble of events and secrets more sinister and terrifying than any nightmare: the rocking chair in the deserted nursery, the eerie sound of a pony and trap, a child's scream in the fog, and most dreadfully--and for Kipps most tragically-- The Woman In Black. The Woman In Black is both a brilliant exercise in atmosphere and controlled horror and a delicious spine-tingler--proof positive that this neglected genre, the ghost story, isn't dead after all.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published December 1st by David R. Godine Publisher first published October 10th More Details Original Title. The Woman in Black 1. Arthur Kipps. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Woman in Black , please sign up.

Read this book over a couple of nights during the winter one year , which I felt helped with the atmosphere of the story. Susan hill is a great author , and her writing really brings this truly scary story together. This is the scariest book I have read. Can you tell me about a book that you feel is more scarier , and why?

Also, her short story The Summer People is probably the scariest short story I ever read. Hey is the movie of the same title base off this book? Jingizu Yes, the movie is based on the book although the ending is slightly different. Lewis Szymanski - no, the movie is NOT a reboot of the TV movie o …more Yes, the movie is based on the book although the ending is slightly different.

It is new adaptation of the novel. And frankly, I thought the movie a lot better than the one. See all 11 questions about The Woman in Black….

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Woman in Black. Alice Drablow is a man by the name of Arthur Kipps. The people of Crythin Gifford are like the people of most small towns, suspicious of strangers and unwilling to help or provide information to outsiders.

Kipps attends the funeral of Mrs. Drablow and has his first encounter with a woman the locals call The Woman in Black. A bonnet-style hat covered her head and shaded her face, but although I did not stare, even the swift glance I took of the woman showed me enough to recognize that she was suffering from some terrible wasting disease, for not only was she extremely pale, even more than a contrast with the blackness of her garments could account for, but the skin and, it seemed, only the thinnest layer of flesh was tautly stretched and strained across the bones, so that it gleamed with a curious, blue-white sheen, and her eyes seemed sunken back into her head.

Kipps is curious, but he has a job to do out at Eel Marsh House to sort through a lifetime of accumulated Drablow paperwork, so he shrugs off the apparition and focuses back on his task.

Eel Marsh House, once the tide comes in, is cut off from the rest of civilization, so Kipps has a choice to either stop early enough to leave before the tide comes in or decide to stay the night in the house. He tries it both ways, but decides that by staying over he will have more time to finish the job more efficiently.

He is a junior associate, after all, and still trying to impress his bosses. He hears noises, unexplainable noises that raise the hair on the back of his neck. But what was 'real'? At that moment I began to doubt my own reality. He asks questions of the residents of the town, but receives few answers. He finds some letters at the house, among the disorder of invoices and scraps of correspondence.

These letters start to fill in the gaps. He soon realizes who the ghost is and why she is still… here. The Woman in Black , as it turns out, wants to share her pain. The implications of this will haunt Arthur Kipps for the rest of his life. The interesting part of the book is that, even though it is of modest length, the actual plot takes a while to develop. While waiting to get to the juicy details, Hill shares some beautiful descriptions of scenery and lays the groundwork for the story.

We are also introduced to a much older Kipps, seemingly irrationally irritated by the extortions of his family to tell them a scary story. Stephen Mallatratt adapted the novel to the play which became the second longest running play in West End history.

A movie adaptation starring Daniel Radcliffe came out in There are reasonably significant changes to the plot in the movie version, but I still enjoyed the experience. It was my first time watching Radcliffe in a grown-up role, and it turned out to be a good choice of script for him.

View all 52 comments. Feb 04, Bill Kerwin rated it it was ok Shelves: gothic , weird-fiction , ghost-stories. A disappointment.

I kept hearing about how this was a real honest-to-god, old-fashioned ghost story steeped in the tradition of James and James Henry and Montague Rhodes that delivered a frisson of genuine terror and some very fine writing as well. I didn't find any of this to be true. For starters, I didn't believe the narrator. He is a man in his forties--self-described as "unimaginative"--who years before suffered a scarring supernatural experience, yet he sounds for all the world like A disappointment.

He is a man in his forties--self-described as "unimaginative"--who years before suffered a scarring supernatural experience, yet he sounds for all the world like a timid watered-down version of a young Bronte heroine or should I just say "du Maurier heroine"? The book is a pastiche of 19th century stylistic cliches, starting with a half-hearted Pickwickian Christmas, moving quickly to a Bleak House inspired description of fog, and soon settling into page upon page of lengthy sentences resembling those of middle-period Henry James, yet which--unlike those of the master--contain no fine distinctions of intellect or sensibility to justify their continual qualifying clauses.

The story itself, although not remarkable, could have been interesting. The first sight of the spectre in the graveyard is chilling, and the subsequent scenes where the hero wanders alone in the fog, hearing horrors rather than seeing them, are undoubtedly effective. But there is only enough material here for a 4,, word short story, and this is a 40, word novella.

It is short as horror books go, but far too long for what it has to say. View all 39 comments. I said in another review that I'm near impossible to scare because my parents were relaxed with horror movie censorship when I was a young kid.

I was oversaturated with horror from a young age and tend to find it more laughable than spine-tingling. However, this book may be the only exception I have found so far.

In recent years I have flat-out avoided horror stories because they do nothing for me I can stomach Stephen King but only because his books tend to be about more than the basic horror I said in another review that I'm near impossible to scare because my parents were relaxed with horror movie censorship when I was a young kid. I can stomach Stephen King but only because his books tend to be about more than the basic horror element.

For me to find this book, a book that is entirely a horror story, to be so enjoyable and so frightening is quite incredible. I don't need to tell you what it's about, you can read that in countless descriptions, but I do need to say just how much this scared me and had me sleeping with the light on all night and jumping up at every single creak and sigh. The image of the woman stood in the marshes with her face wasting away is so vividly described that it was all I could picture for days, I kept looking over my shoulder when I was by myself expecting to see her stood there in her long black cloak.

This lady does very little and is still probably the most frightening character I've ever come across in a novel.

The Woman in Black: A Ghost Story

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There are undertakers with shovels, of course, a local official who would rather be anywhere else, and one Mr Arthur Kipps, solicitor from London. He is to spend the night in Eel Marsh House, the place where the old recluse died amidst a sinking swamp, a blinding fog and a baleful mystery about which the townsfolk refuse to speak. But when the high tide pens him in, what he finds — or rather what finds him — is something else entirely. Susan Hill.

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The woman in black a gho.. After a while, I forced myself to look at the last document also. That too was a death certificate, but dated some twelve years after the other two. It was for Jennet Eliza Humfrye, spinster, aged thirty-six years. But I was too agitated to remain there for long and in the end I called to Spider and went out again into the November afternoon that was already closing in to an early twilight, and began to walk, away from Mr. I felt better for the exercise. There was a chill wind blowing over the fields driving a spatter of hard rain before it. Spider seemed pleased to be out.

Look Inside. The classic ghost story from the author of The Mist in the Mirror : a chilling tale about a menacing spectre haunting a small English town. Now a major motion picture starring Daniel Radcliffe. Arthur Kipps is an up-and-coming London solicitor who is sent to Crythin Gifford—a faraway town in the windswept salt marshes beyond Nine Lives Causeway—to attend the funeral and settle the affairs of a client, Mrs. Alice Drablow of Eel Marsh House.

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The Woman in Black by Susan Hill. Read an Excerpt. Buy Read an Excerpt. Read an Susan Hill has been a professional writer for over fifty years. Her books.

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